New wheelchair

IMG_4188There are certain milestones along this journey of being a parent of a disabled child which are inevitable. Some are actually the omission of milestones: the missing of typical developmental steps, the absence of a first spoken word, there never – in our case – being a first step. Others are very much present: the diagnosis of impairment, the first feeding tube, the first operation.

One of the big ones is the first wheelchair. It’s possible to keep a baby, and then a ‘toddler’, in a buggy for a long time. At some point it becomes clear that the buggy is insufficient and some kind of wheelchair (or the compromise, a ‘Supportive Buggy’ is necessary). This will be for lots of good reasons to do with postural support. It is entirely possible to be convinced by the need for the wheelchair and sad about the arrival of it simultaneously.

Sam had his first wheelchair (more of a supportive buggy) when he was two. It was needed – he didn’t look at all comfortable in the buggy we had for him, and it was showing the strain of near continuous use. So we went for a fitting and a few months later it arrived. We heaved it up the steps to our house.

I wasn’t in love with it, but I could see the advantages. He sat well in it. It folded, so just as with his previous buggy we could lift Sam into his car seat and put the wheelchair in the boot. The slight difference was that doing so injured us almost every time.

Since Sam was still young he often slept in the buggy, and he was sensitive to bright sun, so we asked about a hood and rain cover for the wheelchair (as is standard with  a buggy). It turned out that as these were not ‘essential’, they would not be provided by wheelchair services, but we could choose to buy them ourselves. They arrived just after Eli was born and I remember fitting them while James held tiny Eli. They worked, but were incredibly clunky and would need to be removed every time we put the wheelchair in the car. They looked like something someone had made in their garage and were as far removed from the slick design of a buggy as you can imagine. I was really cross and after crying for a bit I wrote an extremely grumpy letter to the manufacturers which James had to tone down so that it was only quite cross. We sent them back and found our own solution. I have written before about the way things look here

Since then Sam has had two more wheelchairs, each a bit more ‘wheelchairy’ than the last. Over the last six years we have adapted our house and bought a “Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle” (a car with an in-built ramp, blog about it here) so we have fully accommodated the wheelchair into our lives. I see the wheelchair as an enabler for Sam, and we make do with hats and ponchos so there are no resentful conversations with suppliers of wheelchair hoods.

But what I still struggle with is the particulars of each wheelchair. Sam’s wheelchairs are supplied by our local service which is staffed by great people but, like all NHS behemoths, can be a bit inflexible.

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When we first discussed the possibility of Sam needing a bigger chair last year they showed me the type of chair they thought would be most suitable. Even allowing for the fact that it wasn’t the colour we would pick, and wasn’t set up for him, the chair I saw was really ugly. The base looked to me as though someone had rustled it up out of some spare scaffolding poles. I could see it was practical, and I was told that it was one of the most reliable chairs, but it was winning no prizes for elegant design. The seat was covered in weird synthetic fabric that had a clichéd care home vibe. It was enormous compared to his current wheelchair, and relied on a ‘knee block’ (literally a shaped block, fitted around the knees) to keep Sam in the right position, which he had never had before.

I knew Sam would need a new chair soon, and I respect the opinion of an Occupational Therapist who knew about seating for disabled people. But this was a chair that Sam would use every day, sometimes for 12 hours a day. We would see it every day – in our house, in our car, in family photos. In what other sphere of your life would you think about acquiring something like this and accept the first thing offered to you which happens to be the one in stock? Do people buy cars they hate the look of? Do people get dining chairs that they’re not sure they’re going to find comfortable? There is a huge market for buggies which people spend thousands on and have the kind of designers who formerly worked on Formula One cars.

Of course it would be replaced if Sam wasn’t happy and comfortable, but I really hate the clunkiness of wheelchair design. I resent spending a lot of time incorporating Sam’s needs into the design of our home which – if I do say so myself and may possibly have pointed out before – is beautiful AND fully accessible, only to have it cluttered up with something that may be technically good but is aesthetically shit. It’s unfair to have options for large purchases in every other aspect of our lives, but not this.

The wheelchair service was patient, told me to have a think about it, have a look at other options privately (while recounting some horror stories of chairs breaking and families having to arrange fixes themselves…). Meanwhile, Sam kept growing. An engineer came to adjust the eyegaze mount on the wheelchair and we had another conversation about the chair – we all knew his current chair wasn’t quite heavy enough to support the device, and that a bigger chair would be better. After listening to my monologue about scaffolding poles she mentioned that the base came in different colours. She emailed me later to say it definitely came in black.

And so, slowly, I came round to the idea. The seat fabric could also come in black which made it look a bit less healthcare setting. We eventually ordered the new chair, and it arrived last month. Sam very patiently sat through adjustments and we brought it home with us.

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You know when you are away from your kids for a few days and when you are reunited it’s like you are seeing them anew. You notice the size and the feel of them with a jolt – both familiar and novel. It was like that with Sam in the new chair – it was Sam in a wheelchair, which is our daily experience, but he looked taller and older and relaxed. It made me feel like I must have been squeezing him into a ridiculously small chair before, like we hadn’t noticed that he was now eight. Pushing the new chair is like a dream – no weird knobbly bits on the handle, much less veering unpredictably into gutters. It comes with a tray which is a perk. There’s even just enough room on the side bar for Stella to hitch a lift (don’t tell wheelchair services…)

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There’s of course a little hint of melancholy – it’s wider, it will be a bit harder to squeeze into small spaces. We won’t be able to carry him and it upstairs to friends’ first floor flats like we have done recently. These are sadnesses relating largely to physical barriers, not to Sam’s need for a wheelchair.

Sam’s not hugely keen on the kneeblock so we’re taking that slowly (not as unkeen as we originally thought though – turns out his shoes were too small and we hadn’t noticed which was making him understandably grumpy). It’s all come good in the end. Bring on the adventures.

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Having a laugh in Trafalgar Square

We have recently been printing photos – mainly for a wall in our house where we have an ever expanding, slightly chaotic collection of family photos. There is currently not a single photo of Stella on the wall. She is almost two years old. We need to rectify this quickly, before she’s tall enough to see the photos and old enough to mind.

As I go through the photos on our computer, I get distracted by loads that will never make the cut for the wall. I like to think I am a decent photographer, but almost all our recent pictures are badly composed phone photos of non-compliant kids. So I force myself to focus more on the memory and emotion of when the photo was taken, than on the quality of the composition. Kids don’t care if the background is full of mugs and syringes, they just love a photo of them with their dad.

But this photo, I love:

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It is technically flawed, badly composed. But look how happy Sam is! And look at all the tourists wandering around behind him, oblivious!

This was taken during the summer holidays, just off Trafalgar Square. James, Sam, Eli and I had just been to the theatre to see Horrible Histories at the Garrick Theatre. We had brilliant seats. Sam’s space was just off the foyer, at the back of the circle, so quite a long way from the stage but with a brilliant view. This is everything we look for in a theatre seat for Sam: wheelchair spaces in theatres are often right by the stage which he finds a bit much. There have been numerous times when we have had to leave a theatre early because Sam isn’t enjoying the performance. (His other pet hate is unexpected, roaming musicians in theatrical performances. He likes people to stay on the stage, not appear behind him playing a trumpet.)

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The rest of us had seats either side of Sam, and we all enjoyed the brilliant performance. The boys have watched almost every episode of the TV programme so we knew what to expect. It was genuinely amusing for all of us, with poo jokes interspersed with historical facts, and loads of songs. Who doesn’t like a rap about Henry VIII?

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After the performance we went to a café just off Trafalgar Square for lunch. We sat outside, with the pigeons, and put Sam’s ipod on while we were eating. Understandably, Sam gets bored if he’s just sitting around while being fed, and it’s not possible to talk to him or read him a book while eating a sandwich, so we always have a bluetooth speaker attached to his wheelchair (the pink circle by his head) which is connected to an ipod full of audiobooks. I think he’s listening to a David Walliams story in this picture.

I love the photo because how could you not love a kid laughing this much? But also in this photo I see all of the other ways in which I have changed over the seven years I have been his mother. At the beginning going on a trip like this to central London could be a bit daunting – how would we get there? Could we get Sam’s wheelchair in? Had we packed everything? Would Sam enjoy it? When Sam was very small I sometimes felt self-conscious about feeding him in public. I was really aware of how much noise we were making, and would have felt a bit anxious about playing an audiobook in a public place. I might have noticed whether people were looking at Sam, not because I was ashamed of him but because I was worried about him noticing them looking. Sometimes it felt like the logistics involved in getting us somewhere weren’t worth the risk that Sam wouldn’t enjoy it.

This trip was lovely. We packed what we needed (takes time, but we’ve done it hundreds of times) and drove in to the West End. We were a bit early so we had a coffee in Leicester Square. Went to the theatre, had lunch at Pret. Admittedly we had left Stella at home, as she would have added an unnecessary level of unpredictability to the whole outing.

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Not only do we now not care if people see Sam being fed through his gastrostomy tube, we don’t even notice if people are looking. If he laughs hysterically, loudly, we are chuckling with him rather than being self-conscious about other people noticing. If Sam needs to listen to an audiobook in order to not get bored, that’s more important than whether someone doesn’t want to listen to David Walliams in their lunchbreak.

And what this photo shows is that Sam has a brilliant time on these kinds of trips. We all do. He hugely enjoyed Horrible Histories, and now knows more about the naming of Saxon villages than he did previously. He is able to take advantage of us living in London.

And the general public in Trafalgar Square are largely too busy going about their business, admiring Nelson’s Column or grabbing a turmeric latte, to notice whether our son is disabled, or tube-fed, or listening to The World’s Worst Children.

This is the kind of photo I wish I’d had in a crystal ball when Sam was little and not enjoying life. I might laminate it and show it to anyone who gives us the pity-look and talks about how sorry they feel for him. Don’t feel sorry for him or us, he’s having the time of his life!

Sam is 7!

Sam is seven! We celebrated with, amongst other things, an egg-free chocolate cake that I whizzed up in our blender and gave to Sam through his feeding tube.

With every passing year I sound a bit more like my mum: “I can’t believe you’re seven years old! I remember when you were just a baby!” But it’s true – I am genuinely surprised that we have been parents for seven years and that Sam is so big and tall.

As with all recent birthdays, James made a Sam-themed video of the past year and we watched it with our family, projected on to the wall. I would recommend this as a way not so much of celebrating the child’s birthday, though Sam and Eli enjoy seeing themselves, but more as a way of congratulating oneself on another year of parenting. It is heartening to see how much children have changed and grown over the year, how much you have done with them, and ultimately how justified you are in feeling so tired (excerpt from birthday video below).

The other thing that we realise when we (James) make these videos is that there is always way too much material. We have done too much fun stuff and taken too many photos and videos to fit into one short film. It makes obvious that Sam is living a full life, with variety and fun, surrounded by loving family.

Just after Sam’s birthday he had an appointment at our local rehabilitation centre where wheelchair services, assistive technology and other helpful services are based. There are always all sorts of disabled people coming in and out for appointments. I was sitting in reception with Sam and Stella, waiting to be called. Stella was a bit grumpy because she hadn’t yet had her morning bottle of milk, Sam was happy watching a screen showing footage from four security cameras. A lady in a wheelchair was pushed close to us (and I have written that in the passive deliberately, because the person pushing didn’t ask her where she wanted to wait). She was an older lady, I would guess in her seventies, immaculately dressed and made up. She smiled at us and after a few moments said (as is common):

“You’ve got your hands full!”

I smiled and we had a brief chat about how old the kids were, how cute Stella was, how much she liked milk. Then the lady asked, as she looked at Sam:

“Is he able to go to school?”

“Of course,” I said. “He goes to a brilliant school which he loves, don’t you Sam. We’re just here for an appointment.”

I could see the pity-look appearing so I was even more positive than normal about both Sam and his school. But as she was leaving she said:

“It’s so hard for these handicapped children. So hard for their families. I feel so sorry for them.”

It was one of those times when I felt like I didn’t have the words to be able to explain to her what our world is like, what Sam’s life is like, how we (try to) treat him. I have no idea how or why she uses a wheelchair, or how old she was when she first used it, but clearly she has lived a different experience.

It’s impossible in passing conversations like this to say all I want to, but later I felt so sad that she assumed Sam didn’t go to school, that his life is somehow unbearably hard, that it’s okay to talk about him like that right in front of him. Clearly being disabled in some way doesn’t automatically educate you in how to treat disabled kids in 2016 (or 2017).

I don’t want to minimise Sam’s challenges – loads of things are tough for him, almost nothing comes easily, and much is really unfair. And as a family we sometimes struggle when Sam’s disability makes things more complicated for all of us. But right now, as a seven year old boy, Sam is having a good life most of the time (and really, which child is having a good life all of the time? I mean every kid has to tidy up or eat Brussels sprouts or go home some of the time). He has loads of fun. He laughs most days. He is loved. He is learning. He is thriving.

By way of illustration, between his sixth and seventh birthdays Sam:

  • Had a baby sister: tolerated Stella’s wailing, put up with a third of our attention rather than half, learnt to deal with her grabbing onto his legs and pulling his hair. And then got a new baby cousin, Ralph, who also sometimes likes a bit of a wail.
  • Learnt to cycle his trike on his own: whizzed round in circles, racing Eli and being unbelievably pleased with himself. He is still working on learning how to steer.

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  • Made really noticeable progress with communication: starting to eyepoint using his communication book to tell us things, more reliably telling us yes and no.
  • Made huge progress on using his eyegaze computer: using it almost every day, knowing exactly what he wants to do, reliably choosing stories and then navigating through them like a pro, using communication software to create messages that were totally appropriate to the moment.
  • Went on holiday to Cornwall and France: first flight for three years, loads of swimming and beach time, hanging out with family and friends, getting tanned (and on one unfortunate occasion burned), getting a new passport.

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  • So many jokes with Eli. So many lovely moments between these two boys.

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  • Started staying at a children’s hospice for the occasional night, didn’t seem to be traumatised.
  • Moved house, again. Visited the building site to review progress and try out his new lift. Before he is eight he should have managed yet another move, his sixth since he was born.

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  • Began to be hoisted (rather than manually lifted) for most transfers between chairs and beds: coped much better with this than his mum.
  • Listened to lots and lots of audiobooks: his bluetooth speaker and ipod have become essentials wherever Sam goes, and there’s therefore been less screen time, developed a love for the books of David Walliams (except the highly emotional ending of Gangsta Granny) and late in the year Harry Potter.
  • Finished his first year at a new school: totally smashed it, participated in a whole school play in his walker, another year of loving learning, fascinated by the Great Fire of London.

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  • Was increasingly contented: Sam has spent the last year less fractious and generally happier. We spend less time flicking though films to find the one he is happy to watch, less energy trying to entertain him in public places so we can finish our lunch. This is probably connected to us having more (paid) help, and Sam getting older and more mature, helped – we think – by his surgery in 2015. As long as we explain what’s what is going on or is about to happen, Sam is noticeably more able to deal with unfamiliar or demanding environments. Long may it continue.

As we celebrate another year of Sam being our son, I am so very proud of this boy (and still so very sad that seven years ago he was still in hospital). He is such a joy to us all, so filled with patience and humour and determination. Happy New Year everyone – let’s all hope we come across more Sams, less pity and more positivity in 2017.

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A House for Sam

We are adapting our house to make sure it works for Sam. We have moved out and have so far paid builders thousands of pounds to rip things apart and make a perfectly good house look like it’s been hit by a natural disaster.

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(Photo – what will be the lift, lift lobby and therapy/play room)

It’s a big, disruptive, expensive construction project of the kind we (hopefully) will only do once. We plan to move back in to the house next year and then never move again. Or at least not until the house doesn’t suit Sam any more, which we hope won’t be for an extremely long time.

This kind of project throws up a host of issues on every level from extremely detailed (what kind of sockets?) to big questions about the way we want to live our lives. Decisions about designing your family house go to the core of who you are and how you live (or want to live). I’m an architect and these are the issues that first drew me to architecture: how do buildings reflect who we are as people, what we care about and what we do day-to-day. This stuff is deeply personal and others in the same situation would make different decisions. We are extremely privileged to be in a position to be able to craft our house so carefully.

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(Photo – hole for the lift in what was the kitchen)

Most buildings in the world are inaccessible to Sam but we can create a little island of utopian level access, where he can go (almost) everywhere and everything is designed to make all of our lives as easy as possible.

But how do you adapt a house for a disabled person who is currently six years old but will hopefully still be living there when they are twenty six?

How to you make a house perfect for the disabled child, whilst not compromising the personality of the property and making it a house for our whole family?

Should we compromise on the kind of house we want to live in to make it disability-friendly? Is it possible to have have a house that works perfectly for a wheelchair user but that isn’t the first thing you notice?

There are two principles that we have had from the beginning: the house needs to feel like a family house, specifically OUR family house with all of the characteristics it would have had if Sam wasn’t disabled; and the house needs to work perfectly for Sam and enable social connections for him – between family and with visitors. We are currently hyper-aware of some of the downsides of being in a house that hasn’t been specifically adapted. It’s getting harder to give Sam a bath, and even small changes in level get harder to get his wheelchair over as he gets heavier. Because it’s less easy to carry him, Sam rarely comes upstairs to our bedroom or to Eli’s room.

If you go to as many adapted or accessible properties as I do, you’ll realise that ‘experts’ are often expert in how to make a house work for a wheelchair user and that isn’t the same thing as making a home for all of the members of the family in it. The cheapest and easiest way to adapt houses is often to tack an extension on to the back. This makes lots of sense, except it often involves siblings and parents sleeping upstairs and the disabled child never going to their bedrooms. If, like Sam, the child has carers then you can end up with unofficial zones within the house where the disabled person and carers spend most time in particular parts of the house and there’s not enough crossover with other members of the family.

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(Photo – widened doorway)

Sam will be at the centre of our house, literally. There are three floors, and his bedroom will remain on the first floor. We will all pop in and out, or wander past, his room all the time. It also means we, as parents, remain totally involved in every aspect of his life. Even if there are days when carers are spending most time with him, we are there in the background interfering and suggesting, as is the prerogative of a parent. This will be facilitated by a through-floor lift that will take Sam up to his bedroom, but also further up to our bedroom and Eli and Stella’s.

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(Photo – Sam’s bedroom)

Downstairs we will have normal reception rooms (one for family-only since we so often have carers in our house now) with wide doorways, a lift lobby big enough to turn a massive wheelchair and level (or near level) floor finishes. Not a single step on the ground floor. One should not underestimate what a feat this will be involving much chat about thresholds, demolishing a conservatory and building a new dining room. We will have a patio on the same level as the kitchen and dining room, which will ramp down to the garden. Sam will use the same doors as all of us and it should be a mere matter of pushing him where he wants to go, without bumping over ledges and going through alternative doors. The rooms are big enough that when Sam is in even bigger wheelchairs we will still be able to get round him. There will be enough room around the dining table that he should be able to sit anywhere, not just in the one spot that means we can still walk past.

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(Photos – demolished conservatory, building new dining room)

The house will have pieces of specialist equipment, at vast expense, though actually these aren’t as numerous as I anticipated. You don’t need that much stuff if the whole design of the house is built around the idea of a wheelchair being able to get everywhere. The lift is a massive thing (physically and in expense) but a simple idea. There will be track hoists mounted on the ceilings of four rooms (which will mean Sam can be lifted in a sling between wheelchair and bed, for example, rather than being lifted by us). There will be changing facilities on two floors. And there will be a bath.

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(Photo – what will be Sam’s bathroom)

The bath has the subject of much conversation. It is, apparently, easier to shower people in wheelchairs. Easier for carers that is. But we generally operate on the basis of what Sam likes and needs, rather than what suits others. The boy loves baths, so we need a bath. And if that’s a whacking great big thing that goes up and down, needs the floor to be strengthened and a new heating system to produce sufficient hot water, so be it. It will be in a bathroom with two doors – one straight in to Sam’s room so he can go bath-to-bed in one carer-friendly straight line, and one on to the landing that leads to his brothers and sisters bedroom. Because the bath is essentially just a really expensive bath and so it will be the bathroom for all the kids.

We are lucky to be able to ask ourselves how we want our family to work, and therefore how we want our house to facilitate that, and to have the opportunity to alter the fabric of the building accordingly. It is all very exciting but it feels like a huge responsibility – like all construction projects, we’ll only get to do this once and we need to get it right.

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(Photo – looking up three stories of the house through the hole made for the lift)

A friend of mine joked that once we have adapted our houses our kids will be able to visit each other, if not anywhere else. It’s not really a joke – as Sam gets bigger and his wheelchair gets heavier it is becoming harder for us to go to other people’s houses with him and we can’t visit places that don’t have disabled access. So the political becomes personal – we want to compensate for the world remaining inaccessible by making our house a truly welcoming place for Sam and his friends.

 

 

 

‘Looking his best’: attitudes towards wheelchairs

I have been thinking a lot recently about we approach Sam’s wheelchair. I have written before about the differing perceptions of wheelchairs – particularly, how once you are over the psychological hurdle of not walking, wheelchairs are freeing, wonderful things that can compensate for legs that won’t support a moving body. It’s a very simple and elegant solution to a problem. I think the outsider perspective that wheelchairs are constrictive and negative is largely based on someone’s fear that their own legs might stop working. Restrictions placed on wheelchair users are largely a result of the environment around them being inaccessible rather than the inherent disadvantage of using a wheelchair. Perceiving wheelchairs as negative isn’t inevitable – Eli loves having a turn in Sam’s chairs and sometimes wonders whether he’ll have one when he grows up.

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When Sam was small we were fearful of him not walking (though it became clear pretty early that this was likely). When he was young he was in a buggy, which was age-appropriate and no big deal. As he got older he moved into a specialist buggy, and then into a paediatric wheelchair. We needed time to get used to each stage; they were harsh physical reminders to us of his disability. But we accepted and adapted, and actually his inability to walk was towards the end of our list of worries. Sam’s difficulty with eating and communicating were (and are) harder for him day-to-day and have more impact on his quality of life than his inability to walk.

I still don’t love his wheelchair – I don’t think it’s designed that well, or looks that nice. It was given to us by wheelchair services. Considering how much time we spend looking at and interacting with it, I’d quite like to be more involved in the choice. I sometimes resent the difficulty of manoeuvring it around, the fact it means we can’t go in some buildings or use lots of public transport. It’s hard to clean and occasionally bits fall off. But Sam using a wheelchair, and us therefore being able to go to ice rinks, museums and parks, is infinitely preferable to us being stuck at home. He is perfectly happy in it.

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I recently read a blog by Tonia Christle, a disabled woman, about her experience for growing up with a cerebral palsy. She writes about the early years:

‘I am five. 

My family likes taking pictures of my sister and me.  We like being the same.  Our clothes match, but not our bodies, because I have a walker and my sister doesn’t.  When we get our pictures taken, our family likes us to be the same, too.

They like me to stand without my walker.  They say it’s better that way.  They are grown-ups, so I listen.  I stand leaning against a wall, or hanging onto a chair or a cabinet, or my sister.  Just as long as my walker is not in the picture.  My walker makes me worse, so I stand far away from it.

I want to look my very best for the picture so I smile, hanging on very tight so I don’t fall.

My family never came right out and said they wanted “normal” kids.  However, as a young child, I listened to the way my family spoke about me and my adaptive equipment (which is very much a part of me.)  And, though I am now in my thirties, pictures of me with my walker, crutches or wheelchair are rare finds.  Many pictures are portrait-style and don’t even include my legs.’

I am definitely guilty of this to some extent. We have plenty of photos of Sam in his wheelchair (or home chair, or standing frame, or walker). But we also have photos where we have taken him out of his wheelchair so that the chair isn’t in the photo, so he ‘looks his best’. I have taken photos of his face (not his body) because I think this is most photogenic (which is partly because, of course, his face is VERY photogenic in my entirely unbiased opinion!).

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(I’m not pregnant again – old photo to illustrate our normally unsuccessful attempts at group family photos)

We presume competence with Sam (we assume he can understand everything we say), and I try not to let anyone talk in front of him negatively, but I hadn’t really thought about the impact of talking about his equipment.

‘Your child is unique and special because they use adaptive equipment.  It is something to celebrate, because this equipment allows your child the freedom to live the life they want to live.’ Tonia Christle. (emphasis added by me)

This idea of embracing the equipment is crucial if you are the parent of a disabled child, and involves a bit of a mindshift. It takes time, and we are getting better (I hope) as Sam gets older. Being a good mother, and ally, depends on accepting Sam as he is. That means embracing all of him and his aids. His wheelchair makes him better, not worse.

We must accept this not just in words and intention, but in the everyday: in our photos of this time in his life, in how we talk about his equipment. Don’t talk about how annoying his wheelchair is, how cumbersome, or how ugly. Don’t deny how intrinsic it is to him. Don’t let anyone else talk this way in front of him either.

This is obvious. We are careful to talk to our kids about what they can do rather than what they can’t. We talk positively about disability, equality, difference. We need to remember to include Sam’s equipment in our acceptance of his difference.

I was reminded of this revelation by a recent exhibition in London of paintings by Lucy Jones  . Jones is a talented, successful artist who happens to also have cerebral palsy. She has painted self-portraits throughout her career and this exhibition includes a self-portrait with her walker.

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An essay about her work describes the context of her self-portraits (which includes feminism in the 1970s), the effect of prolonged study of her own body, the depiction of her disability:

‘In Lucy in the sky 2005 she wanted to say something about being happy, about feeling safe. She is out walking, with her wheelie; she can’t fall over and is free to go anywhere. The painting started with her face, then she added the black and red top, after that the pale blue trousers. Then she had to decide on the background.’ Sue Hubbard, ‘Becoming Lucy Jones’

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Jones’s disability is represented in her paintings and is part of their creation. She talks about how as her confidence grew through her career, she began to paint more of her body, to paint the ‘awkwardness’ of how she looked with CP. These paintings are about how she sees herself, how others see her, and what others project on to her. The paintings describe her coming to accept her walker as being part of who she is, and having the self-confidence to represent it.

The reality of disability is that much is projected on to disabled people and often the problem is with other people’s perceptions rather than the disability itself. The aids and equipment are helping, they’re not a hindrance, and we should treat them as such.

We mustn’t make Sam think he is less because he uses a wheelchair, but rather try to help him have the self-confidence to use it proudly.

 

References:

Tonia Christle blog: http://www.ellenstumbo.com/growing-up-with-a-disability-the-preschool-years/

Sue Hubbard’s essay ‘Becoming Lucy Jones’ in Lucy Jones: Looking at Self, Momentum Publishing, 2006

Exhibition: Lucy Jones –The Cycle of Life, Flowers Gallery until 21 May http://www.flowersgallery.com/exhibitions/view/lucy-jones

A space rocket for Sam

In December Eli and I went to Sam’s Christmas play at school. It wasn’t what you would call a traditional nativity play – each class did a segment around a theme and Sam’s bit was mainly based on the story of the three pigs and the big bad wolf! This is the second school Christmas play I have been to and they are always a triumph of logistics and imagination.

One of the older classes did a performance based on space, and were dressed as astronauts while singing ‘All About that Space’ to the tune of the Meghan Trainor song. This happens to be one of Eli’s favourite songs and he was outraged, ‘It’s All About That BASS, not SPACE!’

Then, as we watched the kids Eli said loudly, ‘Astronauts are not disabled.’

‘Um, right, don’t they look great?’ I said.

‘Astronauts cannot be in wheelchairs’, he said.

Luckily for me the next stage of the play involved chocolate coins being tossed in to the audience, so Eli was distracted and I didn’t have to deal with the inclusion-disability-space conundrum immediately. But it stayed with me.

Eli is as accepting of difference as you could hope a three year old to be. He’s a kid and they deal mainly in black and white and are hugely influenced by what they see around them. So in the same way that they might think women can’t be sea adventurers because there’s only one poxy female Octonaut on the TV programme, they think astronauts can’t be disabled because they haven’t seen one.

And of course they’re sort of right. It’s unlikely there will be a wheelchair-user visiting the International Space Station any time soon. But it’s also pretty unlikely that any of the children we know will grow up to be astronauts despite their aspirations but we don’t therefore tell them it’s impossible. Right now, they can pretend to be whoever they want to be.

The whole point of childhood is to have dreams and imagination, and the role of parents is to make the landscape of their aspirations as wide and ambitious as possible. That’s why we read fictional books. So in the same way that I don’t tell Eli that he might not meet the stringent selection criteria for space travel, we also don’t tell Sam that he can’t be an astronaut because he’s disabled. In light of Eli’s comments at the play, we spend quite a lot of time talking about how Eli AND Sam can be astronauts. And Stella, come to that (depressingly lack of female astronaut portrayal also).

Part of this issue is about representation – kids needs to see disabled people (and girls, and women, and non-white people, etc etc) in their books and on TV, doing the same things that the able-bodied, white boy characters get to do. That’s what the Toy Like Me campaign is all about – calling on the toy industry to better represent disabled kids. There’s a lovely story about their campaign here

While we wait for the rest of the world to catch up with inclusion, I seized the opportunity for action provided by a massive pile of cardboard following delivery of a new sofa from Ikea and…

I now present to you: THE WHEELCHAIR-ACCESSIBLE ROCKET!

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My eight years of architectural education have not been wasted. It’s big enough for Sam to get in in his chair and still have room for his brother. Eli has decorated it with stars and planets, it has a door to shut out the adults, and interior lighting courtesy of the pound shop. It’s a bit crude, not photogenic and an apostrophe has dropped off but the kids love it.

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IMG_0547James, Eli and Sam have between them created an elaborate bedtime routine which involves turning all the lights off, Eli climbing in to Sam’s bed, and then them playing with various light toys. For slightly obscure reasons, this is called a disco (though it involves no music). Therapists would call it Sensory Play.

We recently bought Sam a Buzz Lightyear toy to reward him for all his incredibly hard work using the eyegaze computer and along with the glow-in-the-dark stars and planets and watching clips of Tim Peake in space, the whole thing has become a bit space-themed. Now, the disco often starts with a little trip in to the rocket and a pretend voyage to the moon before the boys get in to bed.

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If the world won’t provide the imaginative horizons my kids need, we’ll have to create them ourselves.

‘To infinity, and beyond!’

Brothers and sisters

All kids look up to those older than them, and Eli is no different. Sam is almost 6, Eli is 3 and Eli wants to do all of the things Sam does: go to school, go swimming, watch Dennis the Menace.

Eli knows Sam is disabled and because chronology is tricky when you are 3, Eli wonders whether he will become disabled when he is older. He doesn’t see this as a particularly negative potential development. He wants to know whether he’ll get a wheelchair like Sam’s, or go to the same school when he’s disabled.

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There is something bittersweet about our able-bodied son climbing in to Sam’s wheelchair when Sam isn’t using it, about demanding to sit in Sam’s specialist supportive chair to have his snack. I hope it continues like this – Eli’s relaxed attitude to disability is how we would all be if we came across more disabled people at school and work.

Over the summer we went to the Liberty Festival at the Olympic Park . It was on one of those British summer days when the rain was relentless and so I can’t say we stayed that long, but they had curated a selection of cultural and sporting events which deserved sunshine and crowds.

One of the activities was a racing track, and a basketball court, with loads of sports wheelchairs for people to use. What an incredibly simple idea, but have you come across it before? Giving people the opportunity to just sit in a wheelchair? There were loads of kids trying to play wheelchair basketball and race along the track. Eli was super keen even though the chairs were way too big for him, and off he and Sam went to race (with James pushing Sam). He still talks about it – remembering the time that he got to go in a cool wheelchair and raced against his brother.

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I am mindful of this whole business of how you raise siblings of your disabled child. I am pregnant and we expect (fingers crossed, which didn’t go that well with Sam’s birth) another, female, mini-Jess in December. We have thought carefully about this. There are disadvantages to Sam of his parents being spread between other kids, just in terms of time and attention if nothing else – there is less time to model a PODD communication book if another child needs a wee or is in the midst of a meltdown. And there are ever present risks of a sibling feeling like Sam gets the lions share of our attention, of everyone’s attention. Sam’s needs dictate our holidays, mean there are constantly carers in our house, that our lives are disrupted by hospital stays.

Eli is also seeing various things I wish he wouldn’t. He recently asked me to teach him how to click with his fingers. When I asked where he’d seen clicking, he recounted in painfully accurate detail an incident a few weeks ago when a lady (who was in a position of responsibility and should have known better) was clicking in Sam’s face as an apparent attempt to distract or entertain him. When James asked her not to, and suggested she speak to Sam rather than click her fingers directly in front of his nose, she got very defensive and we all ended up having an argument. Eli was with us and was confused by it all, ‘You and Daddy were very cross, and the lady was shouting, and Sam is in our family’. He thinks people shouldn’t click in Sam’s face, but he likes the general idea of clicking.

We hope all of these potential stresses and strains are convincingly outweighed by the massive advantages of there being more people in our gang. Eli loves his brother. He wishes Sam didn’t go to school so that he was at home with us every day. He makes us buy Sam toys so he isn’t left out .

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Meanwhile a chatty 3 year old is a marvellous lubricant in social situations and forces all of us, not least Sam, to engage when it would be easier not to. We do all sorts of things as a family that we wouldn’t do if it were just me, James and Sam. And we all laugh more. We now have to charge the stimulator in Sam’s tummy daily so Eli has been comparing Sam to an iPad. Sam thinks this is funny as do we all. (Yes, we overuse screens in our house and Eli spends too much time with an iPad – another consequence of being Sam’s brother).

So let’s hope we can produce another one like Eli. I mean, of course we won’t. Kids have a habit of being their own people as the two we’ve got have shown. But if the next one is even a bit as accepting then it will be okay.

 

The world of the Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle

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We are spending quite a lot of time at the moment thinking and planning how Sam travels. Now that he and his wheelchair are heavier, it’s more difficult to put him in a car seat and heave the wheelchair in to the boot. And he’s on the cusp of his head popping out the top of the car seat anyway.

We knew this was coming, and had been considering the possibility of a Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle (WAV) for a while. Like lots of these things, it’s important to have the idea suggested early so you can think, ‘Oh, we definitely don’t need one of those yet’. A year or so later, as you struggle to get the wheelchair out of the boot for the third time that day, you think ‘I can see there might be advantages to having a WAV’.

Finally, we got to the point where we had to actually do something about this, not least because we were asking other people to drive Sam places and it’s one thing choosing to destroy your own back but quite another to force it on other people. We also had a couple of long car journeys close together and because Sam kicks all the time, it meant the front passenger had their back pummeled for the entire journey, which can be wearing.

(Side point: Eli (age 3) calls the driver seat ‘Daddy’s chair’ and the front passenger seat ‘Mummy’s chair’ despite me driving more than James. It drives me nuts! I’m trying to raise a feminist!)

WAVs are normal cars that have been adapted to include a ramp so that a wheelchair can be wheeled in and strapped down. We considered the options.

For us, it was crucial to get Sam as far near the front as possible, so we could keep an eye on him and he wouldn’t be totally separate from Eli. There’s something hideous about the idea of me, James and Eli sitting in the front two rows and then Sam being stuck back in the boot. We also need enough space to fit all of our other stuff, but for the car to not be too huge. We borrowed a WAV van last year and it was enormous – like driving a minibus to the shops. We live in inner London – we need to be able park.

We are incredibly fortunate – we have been able to get a brand new car, with lots of amazing features, where Sam is safe and comfortable (ish – his wheelchair needs adjusting but don’t get me started on the FOUR -SIX MONTH waiting list for wheelchair services). But still it will take some getting used to. I have a mixed relationship with unfamiliar cars; I can force myself to drive any car, anywhere (I’ve driven happily in Syria and Qatar) but I get extremely attached to the car I know. I’m currently having to remind myself daily that the new car is better than the old car (which was massive, and intimidating for other people to drive, but feels like my friend and I am – boast warning – amazing at parking it in busy central London).

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Also, a WAV forces you to rethink everything you know about safety. Up until last week, it was all about putting a seat belt on, checking the car seat was correctly fitted. Now it’s a fiddly routine of belts and clamps, tightening and tensioning, remembering the seat belt on top of all the other paraphernalia. In the past, I’ve become blase about inserting nasogastric tubes and tube feeding – clearly it is within my wits to get this process down but it’s going to take a while. And I’m a tiny bit resentful of all this palaver.

The boys need no convincing. Sam is happy to travel in any vehicle that has Charlie & The Chocolate Factory audio CDs playing, and Eli thinks that a car with DVD players and headphones is pretty brilliant. This is a classic example of Eli benefitting from his brother’s disability – Sam has a tendency to vomit in the car which is reduced if he watches something on TV while we drive.

So, apart from the business of going over speed bumps painfully slowly to avoid scraping the bottom of the ramp, and needing to find massive parking spaces to leave room for the ramp, the car is good. We will grow to appreciate the ways it helps us. I will learn to love it.

Chairs of Freedom

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Using a wheelchair is a sort of shorthand for being disabled – easy to understand, simpler to explain than a gastrostomy or dystonia or dysphagia, and a good graphic symbol. It is the approachable face of disability – a chair with wheels! We all understand chairs!

But of course they are also intimidating. Many parents of recently diagnosed babies wonder whether their child will walk, whether they will need a wheelchair. Lots of people have asked us if Sam will walk, whether he will always need his wheelchair. Everyone is preoccupied with walking, when its significance for us has been eclipsed by other more pressing matters. At least weak legs can be compensated for with a chair; finding a way to get round the inability to eat or talk is much more complicated.

If you have the good fortune to walk up stairs and run up hills then a wheelchair seems incredibly restrictive, something to be ‘confined’ to. However, if you find walking difficult then a wheelchair is an optimistic, helpful aid – providing the opportunity to get out in to the world (stairs/kerbs/snow/sand/mud/gravel/cobbles permitting). It’s crucial that it fits right, that it supports in the correct way. Sam spends hours in his.

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Sam’s wheelchair is provided by the NHS (I think, to be honest I’m not certain) through our local Wheelchair Service. We’ve worked our way through a couple so have visited numerous times and once we’re there we meet knowledgeable therapists who try their best to find and adjust the best chair for Sam.

But the process! The process of getting to the actual appointment is enough to drive me nuts.

Unlike every other aspect of interaction with therapists who work with disabled children, there is no process for review except for me to think, ‘Oh, Sam’s grown! He’s not looking as comfortable in his wheelchair, let’s make a wheelchair appointment’. Or to think, ‘Actually he’s flopping to one side in this chair, it could do with an expert reviewing it’.

Meanwhile, if something on the wheelchair breaks, we’re supremely relaxed. Should we find ourselves in a restaurant for lunch and Sam’s footplate drops on to the floor, we just call Wheelchair Maintenance. That is a totally different ballgame. One phone call and they will visit Sam’s chair at school the following day, wheel it off in to their magical van, and back it comes Good As New.

But if I phone the Wheelchair Service because the chair needs to be adjusted or reviewed, they put Sam on their waiting list. Two – four months later he gets an appointment, generally in the middle of the day so he misses hours of school.

One/two/three months is a long time for a boy who sits in the chair every time he leaves the house. Every time he visits the cinema, or gets on the school bus, or goes to meet Michael Rosen.

Of course, what actually happens is that I wait until Sam is looking like he might possibly be getting a bit longer and so in approximately three months time his chair will be too small, and so I phone and put him on the list.

It seems to me ironic that it’s so hard to see a wheelchair therapist, when they more than anyone realise the value of a good wheelchair and take pride in making sure wheelchairs are comfortable and practical.

This is an absurd system. It is bonkers to not acknowledge that children grow. Every other piece of Sam’s equipment can be adjusted by a physio or occupational therapist at home or school, and they will do it within a week or so of a problem being identified.

I have no doubt the reasons for such a creaky system are many and varied; I have expressed my frustration at length with the friendly, talented therapists who work for the service! Presumably there’s not as much money as there could be in areas like this. I have been told it’s difficult to recruit therapists to wheelchair services – it’s maybe not the most glamorous end of the physio world. The service has a high rate of DNAs (Did Not Attends) because by definition the kids they see are more complicated than the general population, more likely to be ill, more likely that something will come up last minute, and the DNAs mean fewer appointments to go around.

One of the advantages of having a comfortable, functioning wheelchair is you can use it to go ice skating. Then you realise that being in a wheelchair works incredibly well. Ice is one of the few environments where people in wheelchairs experience no inconvenience, while walking people are near-incapacitated. Hanging on to Sam’s wheelchair becomes really helpful, and then we can whizz him around at high speed, something he loves, as long as we go as fast as possible.

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(Yes, his shoe fell off. We are in a war of attrition with that right shoe.)