A Weekend Away

We went away for the weekend in June to the Calvert Trust, an activity centre in Devon. James, Sam, Eli and I spent the weekend being the kind of people you see in adverts for happy families. We canoed, cycled, abseiled and swam.

IMG_4193

The Calvert Trust is fully adapted for people with disabilities to be able to do all of the activities on offer. I think of it as Centre Parcs crossed with a youth hostel in a utopian inclusive world.

James and I took Sam there three years ago. Then, we’d had a good time and Sam had had some extraordinary experiences. It was the first time he had been down a zip wire, or canoeing, and he had liked those things, but he hadn’t enjoyed everything. He’d struggled with the unfamiliarity of it all and the amount of waiting involved in being part of a group. In addition to preparing all of his meals in a bathroom, and getting up with him during the night, James and I were also trying to entertain him between and during the activities. It was a worthwhile but utterly exhausting weekend for all of us. I wrote a blog at the time which is here.

This time we took a night carer with us. And Eli.  And realistic expectations.

The combination of Sam being older and Eli’s boundless enthusiasm meant we had a really good time. It was still tiring, but the kind of tiring that comes of having had a fun day with kids who have enjoyed themselves. We went canoeing with Sam sitting in a special seat. We went cycling on special bikes which was marvellous (apart from the moment when Eli careered off into the biggest patch of stinging nettles in Devon). We connected Sam to a rope and dropped him from a perilous height, and then sent him down a zip wire (videos below).

IMG_4230IMG_4098IMG_4072IMG_4109

 

As Sam gets older it becomes hard for us to help him to take risks, to really feel a sense of danger and the physical rush of being thrown or falling, which he has always enjoyed. We always tell people he likes speed – when he goes ice skating we encourage the professionals to take him round as fast as they can. When he was smaller we could easily throw him in the air or push him hard on a swing and he loved it. It feels good to give him the opportunity to be dropped from height in a terrifying way – to hear him shriek and then laugh. Just because you’re disabled doesn’t mean you should be mollycoddled, gently pushed over surfaces with small changes in gradient for the rest of your life.

It wasn’t all wholesome fun. We still had to entertain Sam and cajole him into wearing a helmet. He spent some time watching an ipad while others were doing activities he’d made clear he wasn’t interested in. He and I went abseiling which he hated and it made him cry. I took him back to the room while Eli went climbing because Sam was totally over physical activities by that point in the day.

IMG_4211IMG_4110

But really, that’s fine. It was fun! It was lovely to have a weekend of just me, James and two kids (Stella was at home with family). Away from the activities, we spent more time together as four than we have done for years. The comparison to our previous trip, when Sam was younger and less happy, was stark.

It was one of those trips when Eli makes everything more fun. Sam is often happier when he is around and vice versa. New experiences don’t feel as high stakes when you have two children doing them – if Sam can’t cope with it and has to bail, Eli will probably still have fun so it feels worth the effort or vice versa again. And it’s hard not to enjoy yourself when you have a six year old telling you that what you are doing is fun, awesome, and brilliant repeatedly, before, during and after each thing.

IMG_3973

This visit it happened that ours were the only children there and the other groups were of adults with various impairments, some visibly physical, some not. Eli made friends with some of the other guests, playing table football with them and asking them about their days. The kids stayed up late to watch live music, though we all refrained from the disco. I felt so strongly how idealistic a place it is – somewhere where everyone can do the same activities and eat in the same room, regardless of impairment. No-one needs to explain their disability. Conversations are about what people’s access needs are rather than what they can’t do. No-one stares. It’s how the world should be and we’re so fortunate to get to experience that if only for a weekend.

IMG_4135

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s